Baltimore Times Profile of Turning Point, 8 and 9/14

http://baltimoretimes-online.com/news/2014/sep/12/turning-point-operates-principle-recovery-lifelong/ http://baltimoretimes-online.com/news/2014/aug/08/rev-milton-e-williams-helping-drug-addicts-east-ba/ http://baltimoretimes-online.com/news/2014/aug/29/freed-bondage-drug-addiction/  In August and September 2014, the Baltimore Times ran a three-part series on the Turning Point Clinic. The first installment profiled how the clinic is “leading the people of East Baltimore out of the bondage of drug addiction.” Having recently admitted its 5,000th patient, the clinic has “become the largest faith-based substance abuse clinic in the country, and possibly the world.” The report notes how the clinic currently has approximately 1,800 patients with 39 licensed and certified clinicians. The Time’s second article profiled a Baltimore woman who, partly thanks to the treatment and counseling she has received from Turning Point Clinic, has kicked a 20-year, $1,500 per week, drug habit. The woman has been drug-free for 10 years. The third installment in the series reports on how Rev. Williams has been inspired by his faith to help the drug-addicted. “Everything I have done has been inspired by God, including the name,” said Rev. Williams. “Turning Point means a turning point in your life. We were able to open our doors in July of 2003. Within a few months, every slot was gone.” In addition to Turning Point Clinic, New Life Evangelical Church also operates Hard Times Food Pantry, which distributes more food to the needy than any pantry in the... read more

In August and September 2014, the Baltimore Times ran a three-part series on the Turning Point Clinic.

In August and September 2014, the Baltimore Times ran a three-part series on the Turning Point Clinic. The first installment profiled how the clinic is “leading the people of East Baltimore out of the bondage of drug addiction.” Having recently admitted its 5,000th patient, the clinic has “become the largest faith-based substance abuse clinic in the country, and possibly the world.” The report notes how the clinic currently has approximately 1,800 patients with 39 licensed and certified clinicians. The Time’s second article profiled a Baltimore woman who, partly thanks to the treatment and counseling she has received from Turning Point Clinic, has kicked a 20-year, $1,500 per week, drug habit. The woman has been drug-free for 10 years. The third installment in the series reports on how Rev. Williams has been inspired by his faith to help the drug-addicted. “Everything I have done has been inspired by God, including the name,” said Rev. Williams. “Turning Point means a turning point in your life. We were able to open our doors in July of 2003. Within a few months, every slot was gone.” In addition to Turning Point Clinic, New Life Evangelical Church also operates Hard Times Food Pantry, which distributes more food to the needy than any pantry in the city. Part 1: http://baltimoretimes-online.com/news/2014/aug/08/rev-milton-e-williams-helping-drug-addicts-east-ba/ Part 2: http://baltimoretimes-online.com/news/2014/aug/29/freed-bondage-drug-addiction/ Part 3: http://baltimoretimes-online.com/news/2014/sep/12/turning-point-operates-principle-recovery-lifelong/... read more

Turning Away From Johns Hopkins, WYPR – NPR, 6/14

http://news.wypr.org/post/turning-away-johns-hopkins In June 2014, Rev. Williams – frustrated by Johns Hopkins Medicine’s efforts to keep him from expanding his clinic to include mental health, urgent and primary care services — lead supporters in a protest outside one of the university’s facilities, WYPR, Baltimore’s National Public Radio affiliate, reported. Williams said the expansion of his clinic would save the State of Maryland millions of dollars by redirecting patients from hospital emergency rooms into his urgent care center. The report quotes Rev. Williams’ speech where he alleges that officials at Johns Hopkins and the state health department are conspiring against him. “We now fully understand why the State of Maryland keeps sending its people to conduct repeated inspections of our clinic. Never-ending interrogations and repeated, repeated attempts to find something, anything the state could use to prevent our progress. Or even to shut us down,” Rev. Williams... read more

WBAL on death of manager

BALTIMORE —An executive at east Baltimore’s Turning Point Clinic is missing after a dive off the coast of Indonesia last week, and his co-workers are planning a memorial service in his honor. Thapana Tee Thiracharoenpanya Turning Point Clinic Thapana “Tee” Thiracharoenpanya, 28, disappeared April 17 during a diving trip with three friends in Indonesia when he didn’t resurface after the group got stuck in strong currents, according to the substance abuse clinic. Tap here for video Turning Point said Thiracharoenpanya was last seen signaling that his oxygen was running out as they were struggling to reach the surface. “In Tee’s fashion, he untethered himself to try to get help, and that was the last that they saw of Tee,” said the Rev. Milton Williams, the chief executive officer of Turning Point. His diving partners made it to the surface and were picked up by a dive boat, but Thiracharoenpanya was not with them. “That’s Tee. That’s exactly how he would have handled the situation, and in his efforts, he lost his life trying to save others. It’s a very, very sad time for us,” Williams said. Crews began to search the shoreline of nearby Komodo Island for his body, but so far, he hasn’t been found and is presumed dead. Thiracharoenpanya joined Turning Point’s finance department three years ago and was to be promoted to vice president upon his return. Williams said diving was Thiracharoenpanya’s passion, and he took diving trips all over the world.  He was born and raised in Thailand and left his family there to work at the Baltimore clinic and serve thousands of patients. “Tee... read more

Clinic protests “Big John” over Medicaid payments, The Johns Hopkins Newsletter, 10/12

http://www.jhunewsletter.com/2012/10/25/clinic-protests-big-john-over-medicaid-payments-97563/ In October 2012, the Turning Point Clinic lead a protest outside the Hopkins Hospital over $100,000 owed to the clinic by a Hopkins affiliate for new patient assessments and care. In a report on the protest, The Johns Hopkins Newsletter quoted Rev. Williams: “It is just us, Big John, Turning Point Clinic, whom you’ve fought and sabotaged for 10 years. But today is the day of reckoning. And it’s long overdue. We are here today on your doorstep, Big John, daring to crawl out of your shadow as the self-proclaimed champions of quality healthcare, and from under your thumb, to protest — actually, to condemn — your hypocrisy and... read more

Clinic protests “Big John” over Medicaid payments

A group from the Turning Point Substance Abuse Clinic in East Baltimore led a protest outside the Hopkins Hospital last Thursday, in hopes of garnering attention over the alleged $100,000 that they claim Hopkins affiliate Priority Partners owes them. The Rev. Milton E. Williams, who runs Turning Point Clinic, led the protest. Turning Point Clinic is a walk-in clinic, which utilizes methadone to treat patients addicted to heroin. “It is just us, Big John, Turning Point Clinic, whom you’ve fought and sabotaged for 10 years,” Williams said during the protest. “But today is the day of reckoning. And it’s long overdue. We are here today on your doorstep, Big John, daring to crawl out of your shadow as the self-proclaimed champions of quality healthcare, and from under your thumb, to protest — actually, to condemn — your hypocrisy and greed.” Turning Point claims that Priority Partners has neglected to pay for new patient assessments and care—services that the clinic holds they are required to cover. Kevin Pfeiffer, the clinic’s Chief Financial Officer, explained that Medicaid rules, set by the Maryland Department of Mental Health and Hygiene, require Priority Partners to cover both new patient assessments and the costs per week of continuing care for patients, set by the state at $142 and $80, respectively. “Just about a year ago, Priority Partners stopped paying for new patients’ assessments,” Pfeiffer said. “They did cover some, but I’d say they stopped paying for 90 percent of them.” Pfeiffer said that he had tried to contact Priority Partners about their refusal to cover these services but that the organization never responded. When they... read more

Protesters accuse Hopkins of withholding Medicaid funds

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2012-10-18/health/bs-hs-hopkins-protest-20121018_1_medicaid-patients-medicaid-program-medicaid-funds The Baltimore Sun reported a protest led by Turning Point Clinic outside Johns Hopkins Hospital. The people were protesting Johns Hopkins for owing more than $100,000 in Medicaid payments to the... read more

Methadone clinic considers offering cash to addicts, The Baltimore Sun, 9/11

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2011-09-13/health/bs-hs-turning-point-20110913_1_methadone-clinic-addicts-kathleen-rebbert-franklin Turning Point Clinic proposed paying addicts to come in for treatment, the Baltimore Sun reported. “We are targeting a non-traditional population of addicts that isn’t so interested in treatment,” Rev. Williams said. “This will be an... read more

Methadone clinic considers offering cash to addicts

Northeast Baltimore program says it wants to attract users to treatment and reduce crime September 13, 2011|By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun A Northeast Baltimore clinic that once pitched on-demand methadone to desperate addicts during the late-night hours is focusing on a new idea — paying addicts to come in for treatment. “We are targeting a non-traditional population of addicts that isn’t so interested in treatment,” said the Rev. Milton Williams, who runs Turning Point Clinic, housed in his New Life Evangelical Baptist Church. “This will be an incentive.” The state has yet to approve the original on-demand, or “open access” idea, citing federal rules that require, for example, a lengthy examination of anyone getting methadone, a Schedule 2 narcotic. The incentive, $20 supplied by a private foundation or other group yet to be named, is a “Plan B,” one Williams believes doesn’t need any special approvals because the program would be run as a traditional clinic, just at night with no appointments. Williams had proposed the open-access clinic, from 6 p.m. to midnight, in June, with addicts getting methadone within 15 minutes of walking through his door. It would be an opportunity to steer addicts to traditional treatment, offered at the clinic during the day, though he said he expected many would eschew the opportunity. But he said such a clinic would most certainly stop the crimes of those needing money for a fix, crimes he often witnesses from his North Avenue church. That idea won him support from some police officers and politicians. State health officials said they also supported the idea but needed a full plan... read more

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